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Building Technology
 
Glass in architecture
Glass is an indispensable product for the building industry. Formed by the fusion of sand, soda and lime, it is a membrane of safety, which defends against temperature, noise and dust. Glass has a peculiar characteristic of dividing spaces and at the same time it provides visibility. Its elegant appearance adds beauty and aesthetics to the building and interiors.
There was a time when glass was used mainly for window panes. But now with developing technology, it is introduced as a structural material for curtain walls, partitions, etc. Stained and designer glass varieties have established themselves in the field of interiors and furniture. A large variety of glasses are available in the market today, providing a wide range of possibilities in designing to architects. With its use in interiors, furnishings, windows, skylights, roofs, etc., glass has become an integral part of almost every building.

What do you think about it?!!
Kishore Pudi
Responses
 
Glass in architecture
I want to say that glass materials have been used by the Romans and maybe even before that, and it was later used extensively by the Muslims and became a major material in the building process. I can say they used glass in the "religious buildings" but the secular buildings I am not so sure about.

If we search in our minds and read the old sources which enumerate more and more about the palaces of the sultans and caliphates we could come up with evidence that it was used in that field as well. In the religious buildings it was first used in Islamic architecture -as far as I know - in the Umayyad mosque at Damascus, in the windows among the marble designs.

This composition of the glazed windows or what the traveler Ibn Jubayr called (shamseyya), was the starting point that led to a type of building that would spread all over the Islamic world.

All the examples that I have just mentioned should not deny the use of the glass materials in the mosaics (Arabic: fosayfasaa), which were used in the Qubbat Al-Sakhra (Eng: The Dome of the Rock), and the great mosque at Damascus.
What I have discussed is the beginning of the spread of glass as a material all over Islamic architecture, but in the field of the arts, it is uncountable.
Waleed Akef
Glass in architecture
One architect who best understands glass is Eva Jiricna. Her glass staircase suspended with cable systems is amazing.
Maya Sanskrit
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