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Historic Preservation
 
sarai in mughal period
what could be the typical design of the mughal sarai in india
Rameshkumar Sapru
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sarai in mughal period
Rameshkumar, "Sarai" being the word for palace, substantial building, etc? as in the Turkish word Kervansarai more comomonly known as Caravansarai.
Frank John Snelling
sarai in mughal period
Hi Ramesh,

You can find Sarais in many parts of North India, especially where the Mughals had ruled. There is a place near Varanasi, where they call the town 'Mughal Sarai'. Sarais were places where people could stay over night, on their way to some Pilgrimage or Market for trade.

They can be found in most prominent Mughal cities and constructions like Humayun's Tomb, Taj Mahal, Nizamuddin and so on and have names like Mughal Sarai, Arab Sarai, Shek Sarai etc.

Typically they have simple rectangular plans (2m X 2.5m)one next to other in rows. They have a raised platform and a clear height of 2-2.5m. Some Sarais provide special stables for horses while some don't, and the horses or animals had to be tied off the Sarai limits. Some Sarais could double up as market places as well or they were located in the close proximity to the City Centre/Markets
Sriraj Gokarakonda
sarai in mughal period
Sriraj, Okay what you say sounds like what I know as a Turkish Caravansarai or Han, as in the "Cinci Han" in the centre of the old town in Safrnabolu in Northern Turkey which grew Saffron and I believe was on the Silk Route.

In Safranbolu, I saw several large Mulberry trees with white fruit, which I noted because I know Silk Worms eat Mulberry leaves, although there may be more than one type of Mulberry Tree.

The Cinci Han was the ancient and traditional version of todays` motel, with a double tier of cell like rooms around a central courtyard with fountain on the ground and below ground were stables and storerooms. The construction was and is solid stone and this Han has been restored.
Frank John Snelling
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