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Building Technology
 
Aesthetical appreciation of vernacular architecture
How can we define the aesthetics of vernacular architecture of resort? What impact do local materials and style put on tourists? What are the design principles and theories of vernacular architecture? Please share your views with me. Thanks
Deepika Goel
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Aesthetical appreciation of vernacular architecture
Deepika, `Vernacular style` resort architecture is the use of the local vernacular architecture, but designed to match the lifesyle expectations of "townie" tourists from cities.

Note: To a townie tourist, any building without solid walls, windows, doors, roofs, etc is rural, rustic and quaint.

Therefore, the resort design needs to conform to the expectations of the `townie tourist` while at the same time delight the eye and please the soul through careful use of local vernacular materials and designs.
Frank John Snelling
Aesthetical appreciation of vernacular architecture
Take a look at The Datai Hotel in Langkawi, Malaysia, it is 2001 Aga Khan Award for Architecture winner and can perhaps offer some good lessons.

There is lots of material available on this project in the Archnet Digital Library. See Datai Hotel

Shiraz Allibhai
Aesthetical appreciation of vernacular architecture
The best idea of Aesthetical appreciation of vernacular architecture, I'd say is that you get out of your chair, and go around the city you live, and try your best to observe, continue to observe until you'll hear something in heart that's it... this is vernacular. Then, don't bother yourself with tourists; They love original things.
cheers
Abi Miller
Aesthetical appreciation of vernacular architecture
true..bt can any 1 plz suggest me sme examples in kerala or sri lanka..as m covering these only for now..n i appreciate your views..please tell me something more about your views towards it..
Deepika Goel
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