Analysis of the Built Environment of Informal Settlements using Systems of Settings and Activities
Type
journal article
Year
2011
This study seeks to identify and propose relevant elements and components of the built environment of the informal settlements that need to be considered in intervention strategies and design. The paper is based on empirical research that focuses on informal settlements in Nairobi with the objective of establishing parameters that adequately address the physical, social and economic aspects of the dwellers, which are considered useful in the regularization of these settlements. The built environment provides the setting for human activity and Environment-Behaviour Relations which deals with the relationship between people, society and the built environment offers an appropriate framework of analysis for the derivation of useful design parameters for settlement improvement. With this intention, the paper is composed of three main parts. In the first part, the concept of environment is related to systems of settings and the embedded systems of activities. The second part presents systems of settings and activities in an informal settlement both at the neighborhood and dwelling levels. Finally, the third part presents elements and components of the built environment that play dominant roles in informal settlements. According to the study, systems of settings and activities offer a useful framework for the analysis of the built environment and facilitate the identification of settlement characteristics that form important design parameters in the improvement and regularization of informal settlements.
Citation
Diang'a, Stephen and Adebayo, Ambrose. "Analysis of the Built Environment of Informal Settlements using Systems of Settings and Activities," in ArchNet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 5, issue 1 (2011).
Parent Publications
Authorities
Copyright
Stephen Diang'a and Ambrose Adebayo
Country
Kenya
South Africa
Language
English
Keywords
architectural design
city and regional development
competitions
environment-behavior studies
housing