Ibrahim Bey Imareti
Karaman, Turkey
The Ibrahim Bey Imareti (soup kitchen) is part of a complex which also includes a masjid, madrasa, and the mausoleum of Ibrahim Bek, built by Ibrahim Bek II in 1433. Plainer in style than Seljuk architecture, the imaret is one of the best examples of Karamanid building. It was developed directly from the mid- fourteenth century Musa Pasha Madrasa (demolished 1927), retaining the symmetrical plan and the central dome, but forgoing the arcades on either side of the dome. The two buildings had identical minarets.

One enters the imaret from the north through a porch with a pointed arch, directly into a large central area covered by a simple dome supported by fan pendentives. There are three small chambers either side of the dome. The otherwise symmetrical plan is broken by the mausoleum in the southwest corner which is in an adjacent square building. The masjid at one time had a fine ceramic mihrab, which can now be seen in the Çinili Kösk in Istanbul. It is particularly notable for its red lines which separate the other colors of glaze.

Sources:

Aslanapa, Oktay. Turkish art and architecture. New York: Praeger Publishers, 1971.

Sözen, Metin, and Ilhan Aksit. The Evolution of Turkish Art and Architecture. Istanbul: Has set Kitabevi, 1987.
Location
Karaman, Turkey
Events
1433/836-837 AH
Style Periods
Variant Names
Ibrahim Bey Imareti
Ibrahim Bey Soup Kitchen
Variant
Ibrahim Bey Imareti Cesmesi
Variant
Karamanoglu Külliyesi
Variant
Ibrahim Beg Imaret
Variant
Building Usages
soup kitchen
social welfare