Église Notre-Dame-de-l’Heure
Mosul, Iraq
This church was built in 1872 by Dominican monks.  The clock tower was a gift of Eugénie, empress of France and consort of Napoleon III, as a symbol of appreciation for the work of the priests during the typhoid epidemic of 1879.  The church also features two domed cupolas.  

In 2008 the clock tower was badly damaged by an explosion near the church.  In 2015/1436 AH the tower was completely destroyed.  The current status of the church is unclear. It is reported to be among the 45 Christian institutions "destroyed, occupied, converted to mosques, converted to ISIS headquarters or shuttered" since Mosul came under the control of militants in June 2014/1435 AH1.

NOTES: 
Orthodox Christian News. "All 45 Christian Institutions in Mosul Destroyed or Occupied By ISIS."

SOURCES: 
Bernas, Anne. "Un Trésor De L’humanité Sauvé Des Mains Du Groupe Etat Islamique - Hebdo - RFI." RFI. May 22, 2015. Accessed January 14, 2016. https://perma.cc/DR5H-UK7G.

Dalmais, Irénée-Henri., O.P. "800 Ans De Présence Dominicaine En Orient." Oeuvre D'Orient, no. 774 (2014): 10-16. Accessed January 14, 2016. https://perma.cc/49SX-R8HR.

Duval, Pierre-Gonzalez, O.P. La Mission Des Dominicains à Mossoul. Paris: Bureaux De L'année Dominicaine, 1889. Accessed January 14, 2016. http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5608546n.r=bpt6k5608546n.

"Historic Mosul Clock Whose Ticking Could Be Heard 15 Km Away, Silenced Forever." Niqash. September 24, 2015. Accessed January 14, 2016. https://perma.cc/2TPQ-TBCT.

Orthodox Christian News. "All 45 Christian Institutions in Mosul Destroyed or Occupied By ISIS." Orthodox Christian Network. July 30, 2014. Accessed January 14, 2016. https://perma.cc/MD4D-AFG9.



Location
Mosul, Iraq
Images & Videos
Associated Names
Events
1873 August 4/1290 A
clock tower 1882/1299 AH
destruction
Variant Names
Église Notre-Dame-de-l’Heure
Couvent dominicain
Alternate
Damascus Mission
Alternate
Church of the Dominican Fathers
Alternate
كنيسة الساعة
Vernacular
Building Usages
clock towers
public monuments
church
religious
convent
religious