Bayt al-Tutunji
Mosul, Iraq
The Tutunji (or Toutounji) House is an example of early ninteenth-century vernacular architecture in Ottoman Iraq. The house served as a private residence for an elite family and bears the trademark features of residential commissions, including broad iwans at the exterior courtyard. The Tutunji House was destroyed during the occupation of the city by Daesh (The "Islamic State" or ISIS) from 2014 to 2017.[1]


Notes

  1. Matthews et al. "Heritage," 8.

Sources:

Matthews, Roger, Qais Hussain Rasheed, Mónica Palmero Fernández, Seán Fobbe, Karel Nováček, Rozhen Mohammed-Amin, Simone Mühl, and Amy Richardson. “Heritage and Cultural Healing: Iraq in a Post-Daesh Era.” International Journal of Heritage Studies 26, no. 2 (February 1, 2020): 120–41. 





Location
Mosul, Iraq
Images & Videos
Associated Names
Events
1812/1227 AH
Style Periods
1299-1922
Variant Names
بيت التوتونجي
Original
Bayt al-Tutunji
Transliterated
Beit el Toutounji
Alternate transliteration
Tutunji House
Translated
Toutounji House
Transliterated
Building Usages
private residence
residential
house
residential
Materials/Techniques
stone
limestone
granite
brick
wood
Keywords
vernacular architecture
courtyard houses
courtyards
houses